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GAPPS Moms

GAPPS Moms

GAPPS Moms Make Healthier Futures Possible

Read the latest GAPPS Moms Newsletter

GAPPS’ success depends on the voluntary participation of thousands of women who make our research efforts possible by providing information and lab specimens to the GAPPS Repository. Their contributions are essential to our growing bank of knowledge, and will lead to improved health for future generations around the world.

Fundamental to improving birth outcomes, the GAPPS Repository provides data and specimens researchers need to discover the building blocks of healthy pregnancy—enabling the understanding of:


Watch a GAPPS Mom's Story
 

How it Works
Each GAPPS Mom fills out three questionnaires, and provides blood, urine, cord blood and placental tissues and other specimens during the course of normal prenatal and postpartum care visits. Additional data is collected from maternal and newborn medical records.

The GAPPS Repository maintains the highest standards of privacy and confidentiality. Repository materials are identified only by number, with participant names kept in protected files at each collection site.

“We depend on women around the world to help us improve birth outcomes. GAPPS Moms are our research partners, making a healthier future possible for untold women and children.”
— Dr. Mike Gravett, GAPPS scientific advisor


Making Every Birth A Healthy Birth
When student filmmaker Stephen Levandowski found out about the GAPPS Repository, he wanted to chronicle how this biobank of pregnancy specimens and data was helping to advance research into preventing preterm birth, stillbirth, and other pregnancy complications. The result is his film, "The GAPPS Repository: Making Every Birth A Healthy Birth."


Why I’m a GAPPS Mom
Learn why GAPPS Moms choose to be part of solving the prematurity and stillbirth puzzles:

“I want to try and help other women and hopefully find a way to prevent this from happening again because it’s a really hard experience. Being a part of this research is a very little thing that women can do to try to prevent it.”
—    Cecilia lost her first baby after delivering at 23 weeks

“If there’s any information you can gain from my pregnancy, that’s wonderful — to be able to give insight into why things happen the way they do. If there’s anything that can be done to prevent prematurity and stillbirth, that’s great. Being a part of the study is so easy and there are no extra steps or appointments involved.”
—    Julie

“If our situation can help babies in the future, then that is all the reason I need to join this research effort — maybe something like this can be foreseen and prevented. My situation completely caught us completely off guard. I was an extremely low-risk person, it just kind of happened.”
—    Laci delivered her son seven weeks early

“Preterm births and stillbirths are major health issues in rich and poor countries alike, a private loss to many families that should be on the public’s priority list. With greater understanding of the causes of preterm birth and stillbirth, we can prevent many losses, and make every birth count.”
— Dr. Joy Lawn, senior research and policy adviser, Saving Newborn Lives — Save the Children. Dr. Lawn was born prematurely in the bush in Africa; both she and her mother survived.


 

GAPPS REPOSITORY

Discover how our widely accessible biobank is helping scientists close the knowledge and solution gaps.

GAPPS Projects

Learn how GAPPS research and advocacy efforts are working to prevent preterm birth and stillbirth.

Ways to Help

Power research efforts to improve birth outcomes around the world. Join our donor community today.

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